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Korean Club: Connections around the world

Hnouci Lee, News and Sports Editor
February 17, 2010
Filed under News

  You can call it an addiction, an obsession, or admiration, but K-pop fans are head over heels about Korean bands. Super Junior, Girls’ Generation, Miss A, Shinee, Big Bang, 2NE1, 2PM, and Beast are all well known, but the members of Harding’s Korean club don’t only love the music and bands; they also love the culture.
Two alumni thought they could achieve their goals by expanding their knowledge of the Korean culture. They would need to create a network and communicate with other associations, and now the expansion is happening. “We’ve already contacted a group of young women in Korea, Korean American Women’s Association and Far East Movement,” said Panou Hang, the president of Korean club.
“We wanted to expand our network to Korea to get more involved in their actual culture and living,” said Steven N. Yang, a junior.
“By doing so, we’ll be able to promote Harding’s Korean club and to be involved
with the Korean community,” added Yang.
Yang is the secretary of Korean club and is updating this network. Other than himself, the officers in Korean club also contributed a part. The start of this idea came from the first advisor, Nhialee Vang, and former President, Tiffany Yang.
All the members are informed and involved if they choose to be. “We usually update the members on what’s going on and what we are planning,” Yang continued. “We don’t only want Harding students to join, but anyone can join us. For example, we have students coming from other schools that attend our weekly meetings.”
The idea of expanding Korean club’s network started with a discussion of goals on how to strengthen and to give the members a better experience of the club. One of the members in Korean club said, “Korean club is a like a big loving family. It’s not about the Korean stuff; it’s about making new friends, showing you, being a family, and most importantly having fun. People think that they have to like and know about Korean stuff to be in there, but really, you don’t.”
The officers and alumni focus on giving the members “first hand experience” in order to understand the Koreans’ life style and culture.
To expand networking they’ve also wanted to contact KSA, Korean Students Association at the University of Minnesota.
Another goal Korean club has set was to perform at the Multicultural Festival Performance and in the next few years to sponsor the Sadie Hawkins Dance. “It’s a plan in progress and small steps towards something big,” said Yang.

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