The Beacon

Yearbooks may not continue next year

A+poster+filled+with+names+of+students+that+bought+a+yearbook.
A poster filled with names of students that bought a yearbook.

A poster filled with names of students that bought a yearbook.

Tony Vue

Tony Vue

A poster filled with names of students that bought a yearbook.

Pyo Cho, Reporter

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Teresa Holmes, art teacher at Harding High School, said the Yearbook program has a probability of shutting down after this year if they don’t sell enough yearbooks.

This would mean the loss of a tradition that has been going on ever since 1932. Today, it is harder to sell the yearbooks than it used to be. “The number one thing kids came back and said is the yearbook being too expensive,” Ms. Holmes said.

Central High School students are paying $65 and Hudson students are paying $75. “No, I don’t think it is expensive compared to what other schools are paying,” Ms. Holmes said.

Ngia Lor and Stephanie Xiong, editors of the yearbook, also shared their thoughts on this. “I think $30 is a pretty good deal because of the work we put it and the time we spend on yearbook,” said Ngia.

Stephanie agreed. “I think it makes the $30 standards because of the quality, I understand that some families are financially disprivileged so they can’t afford it, but we would like it if everybody could support the yearbook.”

It was pointed out that many students wait until their senior year to buy yearbooks.

Abigail Vang, another yearbook editor, pointed out that “that could determine whether any students after this year will be able to buy a yearbook, so why wait?“ she said.

If Yearbook ends up closing, it could be gone forever like the sports that once existed and never came back. Because the yearbook is in debt, the principal cannot let it continue if they can’t pay back what they owe. “The amount of people that’s buying it is the same amount as last year,” said Ms. Holmes.

The students in Yearbook did put up posters to prevent this from happening but didn’t have the chance to do other things, so they want to do more, like fundraising. Ms. Holmes unfortunately didn’t find out about this situation until February. “We could’ve done some fundraising if I had found out about this situation earlier,” said Ms. Holmes.

Ngia said students involved in the yearbook put a lot of time into it. “Yearbook is made by our time,” he said “It is not homework or an assignment. We use our time to come to school events to take pictures. Some of us have lives and have stuff to do too, but we commit ourselves to it and don’t get home till late at night.”

Ngia wants people to acknowledge how much time it takes to make a yearbook.

Some students wait until the yearbooks have been ordered, then decide whether to buy it or not because they want to make sure they like it. “People often think of the price first before thinking about the quality of the book or what goes in it,” Stephanie said, adding that that makes it hard for the students because the Yearbook staff won’t order as many, so they might not have extra yearbooks for the students who are buying it after it comes. “People think it isn’t important, but to me it is because it recaps the whole year.”

Yearbook is very special to the students in the Yearbook class, especially to Ms. Holmes. The yearbook captures the memories of Harding students, and this benefits them because in the future, they can go back and remember their experience of high school. “To me, Yearbook means a lot because it holds memories from the entire whole school year,” Ngia said. “To other people, they tend to think it’s expensive, but they don’t realize what a picture could tell.”

Ms. Holmes agreed. “I think Yearbook is important because it tells the story of each school year or the events that happen,” she said. “It also keeps lots of special memories.”

Jumy Miko, a senior, also thinks Yearbook should not shut down. “I don’t want it to close because yearbook creates lots of memories, especially for the seniors,” she said. “When you buy a yearbook, you get to let teachers write notes. Plus you get to see all your classmates.”

Jumy also wants the yearbook to keep the price low because it is a school organization. “They should create something affordable for everyone,” she said.

Jumy said she plays a sport in the spring season, but they don’t usually get pictures taken because the yearbook has already been ordered. “The spring season usually gets excluded because the yearbook has already been ordered.”

Overall though, Jumy thinks Yearbook is doing the best they can and she thinks Yearbook should keep going for the upcoming classes so they can get a yearbook too.

 

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Yearbooks may not continue next year